Richard M. Davies ’86

The Clemson Alumni Association presented Richard M. Davies, a Charlotte business owner and volunteer, with the 2017 Distinguished Service Award, the association’s highest honor for a Clemson graduate.

“Rich Davies sets an extraordinary example of what a Clemson graduate can accomplish,” said Clemson University President James P. Clements. “He is a leader in his career, he is a dedicated public servant who gives back tirelessly to his community, and he is a loyal and devoted Clemson supporter. We are exceedingly proud to call him part of the Clemson family.”

Richard M. Davies

Richard M. Davies

Davies grew up in Durban, a coastal city in South Africa, playing soccer and rugby, and briefly competed as a professional cricket player in England. His family moved to the United States in 1982. After making a phone call to Danny Ford, Davies became a kicker for the Clemson University football team. He played football from 1982 to 1985 and graduated with a bachelor’s degree in business administration in 1986.

A third-generation commercial property developer, Davies began his career in banking and loans before joining his father’s development business. Davies then founded and is now CEO of Pavilion Development Company, a real estate development firm based in Charlotte.

Davies has given back as a leader and visionary to several Clemson programs. He is a member of the Trevillian Cabinet for the College of Business and served as vice-chair on the executive committee of The Will to Lead capital campaign. An avid fan of Clemson athletics, Davies served on the athletic director’s advisory council and football committee under Terry Don Phillips. He is also president of the All-In Team Foundation founded by Dabo and Kathleen Swinney. He has supported the Tiger Golf Gathering and the new Larry B. Penley Jr. Golf Facility and hosts an annual PGA Championship dinner for Clemson leaders and Charlotte-area alumni.

From helping the disadvantaged to promoting education and conservation, Davies has been a leader for a variety of charitable causes. He’s served on the board of the Novant Foundation-Presbyterian Medical Center since 2009. He was named to the Forest Hill Church Council of Elders and is the past chair of the church’s finance and risk management committee and governance committee. He is a past chair of the Mecklenburg County board of advisers for Easter Seals, past member of the board of trustees of Charlotte Latin School, and past member of the board of Habitat for Humanity of Charlotte. Davies is currently a member of the board of directors for the Guy Harvey Ocean Research Foundation. Tapping into a passion to help his home country, Davies founded the Sbonelo Scholarship Foundation that awards scholarships to economically disadvantaged students in South Africa to attend top boarding schools.

The prestigious Clemson Alumni Distinguished Service Award is based on three main criteria:  personal and professional accomplishments; dedication and service to Clemson University; and devotion to community and public service. Members of the Clemson family nominate potential winners, who are then selected by the Clemson Alumni Association as outstanding alumni, public servants and examples to others.

“I have had a front-row seat in watching Rich serve and give to [Clemson] in so many ways,” wrote Dabo Swinney, head coach of Clemson Football.  “He has given of his financial resources, but his service goes way beyond that. He has been a servant leader for Clemson both academically and athletically as he has chaired or led many different committees. He is the epitome of this award and the true spirit of Clemson.”

Davies and his wife, Kelly Carr Davies (’86), live in Charlotte and spend time in Florida. Their two sons, Christopher and Timothy, both graduated from Clemson, as did their daughter-in-law, Lauren Holley Davies.

John W. Kelly Jr ’77

The Clemson Alumni Association presented John W. Kelly Jr. of Boca Raton, Florida, with the 2017 Distinguished Service Award, the association’s highest honor for a Clemson graduate.

“John Kelly sets an extraordinary example of what a Clemson graduate can accomplish,” said Clemson University President James P. Clements. “He is a leader in his career, he is a dedicated public servant who gives back tirelessly to his community, and he is a loyal and devoted Clemson supporter. We are exceedingly proud to call him part of the Clemson family.”

Kelly began his career in 1982 as an assistant professor at Texas A&M University. Three years later he returned to Clemson, rising from professor to chair of the horticulture department as well as director of the Clemson Botanical Garden. He helped the garden become the official South Carolina Botanical Garden and developed its Wren House and geology museum. In 1997, he was named vice president for Public Service and Agriculture (PSA) and, in 2010, became Clemson’s vice president for economic development.

During his 28 years at Clemson, Kelly led initiatives to create, build and fund some of Clemson and PSA’s most extensive projects. He spearheaded and then directed the Clemson University Restoration Institute (CURI). He then led a team to secure the largest competitive renewable energy grant in U.S. Department of Energy history at the time, which along with public and private grants, built the SCE&G Energy Innovation Center at CURI. During his tenure, he helped obtain several of the largest gifts in Clemson’s history.

Kelly served on Clemson’s board of trustees’ university land and capital assets stewardship committee; the president’s administrative council, cabinet and implementation teams; and assisted in outlining Clemson’s clean energy strategy. He was one of three mission vice presidents and helped lead the development of two 10-year strategic plans for Clemson. Kelly secured funding for several endowed chairs and helped form academic partnerships between Clemson and other state schools. A longtime member of IPTAY and the Clemson Alumni Association, Kelly has also hosted many alumni events.

In 2014, Kelly became the seventh president of Florida Atlantic University, which he has led up the rankings to become the top-performing university in the state according to state accountability rankings. Nationally, he served on the boards of the Administrative Heads Section of the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities and the American Distance Education Consortium.

The prestigious Clemson Alumni Distinguished Service Award is based on three main criteria:  personal and professional accomplishments; dedication and service to Clemson University; and devotion to community and public service. Members of the Clemson family nominate potential winners, who are then selected by the Clemson Alumni Association as outstanding alumni, public servants and examples to others.

“Dr. Kelly’s contributions to Clemson University and to the people of South Carolina will be of long-lasting value to our farmers, our citizenry, and to the state’s economy,” wrote George Askew, dean of Clemson’s College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences and vice president for Public Service and Agriculture.

Kelly lives in Boca Raton with his wife, Carolyn Boltin Kelly (CU ‘99), and their children Carly and Stella. His children, Christopher and Kimberly, are both Clemson graduates.

Ronnie D. Lee ’76

The Clemson Alumni Association presented Ronald D. Lee, D.M.D., of Aiken with the 2017 Distinguished Service Award, the association’s highest honor for a Clemson graduate.

“Ronnie Lee sets an extraordinary example of what a Clemson graduate can accomplish,” said Clemson University President James P. Clements. “He is a leader in his career, he is a dedicated public servant who gives back tirelessly to his community, and he is a loyal and devoted Clemson supporter. We are exceedingly proud to call him part of the Clemson family.”

Lee graduated Clemson with honors in microbiology in 1976, then earned an M.S. in environmental science and engineering at UNC-Chapel Hill. After working several years as an engineer, he enrolled in dental school, earning a Doctor of Dental Medicine from the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) in 1988, having served as president of his class all four years. As a dental student, he earned three prestigious awards for scholarship and leadership. Having practiced dentistry in Aiken for 28 years, Lee has been recognized for leadership and excellence in his field, including being named a Fellow of the Academy of General Dentistry, a title given to only 7 percent of practicing dentists nationwide.

Lee has donated significant time and talents to Clemson University. He is active in the Aiken County Clemson Club and, as a member of the Clemson board of visitors, he hosted new student receptions in Aiken. In 2010, the South Carolina General Assembly elected Lee to the Clemson board of trustees, where he currently serves on the committees for Educational Policy, Finance and Facilities, and Student Affairs. He served on the presidential search committee that recommended James P. Clements, and he currently is serving his sixth year as trustee liaison to the board of visitors.

For 45 years, Lee has been an active member, past deacon and volunteer at Millbrook Baptist Church and has served as a medical missionary to Honduras. He has served on the board of Dollars for Scholars, a college scholarship program for local students. In 2015, he was named one of six trustees for the Sage Valley Golf Club Foundation, which hosts the world’s premier international junior golf tournament.

The prestigious Clemson Alumni Distinguished Service Award is based on three main criteria:  personal and professional accomplishments; dedication and service to Clemson University; and devotion to community and public service. Members of the Clemson family nominate potential winners, who are then selected by the Clemson Alumni Association as outstanding alumni, public servants and examples to others.

“Dr. Lee has my highest recommendation for this prestigious recognition,” wrote S.C. State Senator Tom Young Jr. “Few have served Clemson or will serve Clemson with as much passion and commitment and in as selfless a manner as Dr. Lee.”

Lee is married to his high school sweetheart and ’76 Clemson graduate Debra Crawford Lee, who worked with other Clemson board of visitors’ spouses to establish the Grace Catherine Clements ClemsonLIFE Endowed Grant-in-Aid. Together the Lees also support an annual scholarship at Clemson in their names, the Emerging Scholars Program and the Barker Scholars Endowment. They have three children, Meredith Pricket, Allison Nelson, and Ryan Lee, and seven grandchildren.

Perry Sprawls Jr ’56, M’61, PhD’68

The Clemson Alumni Association presented Perry Sprawls Jr. of Black Mountain, North Carolina, with the 2017 Distinguished Service Award, the association’s highest honor for a Clemson graduate.

“Perry Sprawls sets an extraordinary example of what a Clemson graduate can accomplish,” said Clemson University President James P. Clements. “He is a pioneer and leader in his career, he is a dedicated public servant who gives back tirelessly to his community and communities around the world, and he is a loyal and devoted Clemson supporter. We are exceedingly proud to call him part of the Clemson family.”

Born on a farm in Barnwell County, South Carolina, that had been in his family since 1812, Perry Sprawls Jr. grew up working in agriculture and learning the new technology of electricity.  Sprawls earned a bachelor’s degree from Clemson University in industrial physics in 1956 and was commissioned a second lieutenant in the Army Signal Corps. After serving and working at Bell Labs, he returned to Clemson for the new nuclear science program, earning a master’s degree in 1961 and then earning Clemson’s first doctorate in bioengineering in 1968.

Sprawls found the opportunity to apply nuclear physics to medicine as a professor in the radiology department at Emory University. After 45 years, he retired in 2005 and became a distinguished professor emeritus. His career in medical physics includes serving as director of Medical Physics in Radiology at Emory; co-director of the College of Medical Physics at the International Centre for Theoretical Physics in Trieste, Italy; director for Medical Imaging Continuing Education for the American Association of Physics in Medicine; and co-editor of “Medical Physics International.”

His passion for expanding medical education on a global basis, particularly in developing countries, led to establishing the Sprawls Educational Foundation, which provides textbooks, online resources and collaborative teaching methods to improve global medical education. He led the establishment of the Emory University-Xi’an Cooperative Program in Radiology in China. In pursuit of expanding and improving medical education, Sprawls has taught in 14 countries and had post-graduate students working in more than 70 countries.

Sprawls’ love for Clemson led him to help the class of 1956 select the Class of 1956 Academic Success Center as their 50-year anniversary project. The center opened in 2012 and contains a suite of rooms dedicated to his parents, Neva and Perry Sprawls Sr.

Sprawls has served as a deacon and leader in the Baptist church and on the board of directors for the Asheville Lyric Opera. With an ongoing interest in preserving rural South Carolina history and heritage, one of his current projects is hosting the Barnwell County Virtual Museum.

The prestigious Clemson Alumni Distinguished Service Award is based on three main criteria:  personal and professional accomplishments; dedication and service to Clemson University; and devotion to community and public service. Members of the Clemson family nominate potential winners, who are then selected by the Clemson Alumni Association as outstanding alumni, public servants and examples to others.

“Clemson University can take pride in one of its graduates who has, and continues to, make major contributions to improve health care and education in virtually every country of the world,” wrote Dr. Debra Monticciolo, FACR, professor of radiology at Texas A&M University and vice-chair for research in breast imaging at Baylor Scott and White Health, who worked with Sprawls to modernize mammographies in China.

Sprawls now lives with his wife, Charlotte, in Black Mountain. Their son, Charles Perry, is a professional singer based in New York.

James H. Stovall ’51

The Clemson Alumni Association presented James H. Stovall of Greenville with the 2017 Distinguished Service Award, the association’s highest honor for a Clemson graduate.

“Jim Stovall sets an extraordinary example of what a Clemson graduate can accomplish,” said Clemson University President James P. Clements. “He was a pioneer and leader in his career, he is a dedicated public servant who gives back tirelessly to his community, and he is a loyal and devoted Clemson supporter. We are exceedingly proud to call him part of the Clemson family.”

Stovall graduated Clemson in 1951 with a bachelor’s degree in civil engineering and, after serving with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in Korea, went on to receive one of the first master’s in environmental engineering from Georgia Tech. A pioneer in air pollution control and environmental engineering, Stovall has also volunteered significant time and talents to charitable organizations in Greenville and Anderson, as well as served his alma mater.

Active in the Clemson Alumni Association since graduation, Stovall served on the Golden Tiger Reunion Class’ finance committee. He is an avid supporter of Clemson’s military traditions: he joined the Clemson Corps; was on the committee that created Military Heritage Plaza; chaired the committee responsible for Basketball Military Appreciation Day; has organized the ROTC Seniors’ Recognition Dinner; and contributes to a scholarship for Army and Air Force ROTC.

Stovall’s community service is rooted in a passion for Christian education and helping those who have less. He was a Boy Scout Troop Leader and District Commissioner for Upstate South Carolina. He volunteered at the Greenville Salvation Army for many years, including as chairman of the advisory board and capital campaign leader, and helped raise funds to build the Ray & Joan Kroc Community Center.

Stovall is a lifetime trustee at Anderson University, where he has served as chairman of the board of trustees, vice chairman of the presidential search committee and member of the committees that built the Thrift Library and Student Center. Additionally, he has led dozens of church mission trips, served as a deacon in many Baptist churches and served on the executive committee of the S.C. Baptist Convention.

The prestigious Clemson Alumni Distinguished Service Award is based on three main criteria:  personal and professional accomplishments; dedication and service to Clemson University; and devotion to community and public service. Members of the Clemson family nominate potential winners, who are then selected by the Clemson Alumni Association as outstanding alumni, public servants and examples to others.

“Jim Stovall’s technical acumen, visionary leadership and professional service have had a positive impact on the lives of residents of the state of South Carolina, the Southeast and nationally. He is most deserving of the recognition of the Alumni Association’s Distinguished Service Award,” wrote retired Greenville-based architect F. Earle Gaulden (’51).

Stovall and his wife, Gloria, live in Greenville. They have three children: Beth, Jim Jr. and Steven, and five grandchildren, including twins who will be attending Clemson this August.

Leslie Dunlap Callison ’81

The Clemson University Alumni Association will present Leslie Dunlap Callison of Lexington with the 2016 Distinguished Service Award, the association’s highest honor.

“I am extremely proud to honor Leslie Callison with the Distinguished Service Award,” said Clemson President James P. Clements. “She has done so much to support Clemson, and I am truly grateful for her contributions. Her personal accomplishments serve as a wonderful model for our current anScreen Shot 2016-05-18 at 10.55.38 AMd future students.”Callison graduated Clemson in 1981 with a bachelor’s in Administrative Management and went on to receive a Masters of Business Administration from the Unviersity of South Carolina in 1985. She has worked in the banking and pharmaceutical industries, and has contributed her time and talents to organizations in her hometown and at Clemson University.

Callison has dedicated much of her life to serving her beloved alma mater. She was president of the Alumni Association from 2008-2010, and served on the University Foundation Board of Directors, IPTAY Board of Directors, and the Women’s Alumni Council Board of Directors. Callison and her father, R. Thornwell Dunlap Jr, are the first father and daughter to serve as the Clemson Alumni Association President and to receive the Distinguished Service Award.

Callison spreads her generous spirit outside of Clemson to the great benefit of her community. She has served as a member of the founding Board of Directors of Columbia’s EdVenture Children’s Museum, treasurer of Junior League of Columbia’s Holiday Market, and Deacon at Saxa Gotha Presbyterian Church. She was also extensively involved in her children’s schools and activities, winning “Volunteer of the Year” in the Lexington School Sytem. Most recently, Leslie has worked as a community technology adviser for the nonprofit group Connect South Carolina.

“The Distinguished Service Award was created to honor the dedication and service of Clemson graduates to their alma mater, their community, and their profession; i.e., this special award was created to honor Leslie Callison,” Clemson president emeritus James F. Barker wrote in his letter supporting her nomination for the award. “Clemson University would not be having the success, progress and impact we are having without her insight and energy.”

Callison lives in Lexington with her husband, Scott. Together, they were awarded the Clemson Parents’ Council Chair Award, Parent Volunteers of the Year in 2010. They have two children who are also Clemson graduates –Reel ’12 and Caroline Lambert ’10.

Janine Anthony Bowen ’89 M’91

The Clemson Alumni Association will present Janine Anthony Bowen of Stone Mountain with the 2016 Distinguished Service Award, the association’s highest honor.

“I am extremely proud to honor Janine Bowen with the Distinguished Service Award,” said Clemson President James P. Clements. “She has done so much to support Clemson, and I am truly grateful for her contributions. Her personal accomplishments serve as a wonderful model for our current and future students.”

Screen Shot 2016-05-18 at 10.57.44 AMHer blend of skills as an engineer, technologist and attorney have led to a highly successful career in technology industry. She is a founding partner of JACK, an Atlanta-based law firm that specializes in negotiating strategic technology and intellectual property deals with Fortune 500 companies. In 2015, Bowen merged her practice with the national law firm LeClairRyan PC, where she is now a shareholder.Bowen graduated from Clemson in 1989 with a bachelor’s and in 1991 with a master’s degree, both in industrial engineering. She earned a juris doctor from Georgia State University College of Law in 1998.

Bowen has exhibited steadfast loyalty to Clemson by giving her time and skills to serve multiple alumni organizations. She served on the boards of directors of the Clemson Alumni Association and the Clemson Black Alumni Council. She also served on the boards of the Atlanta Clemson Club and the Atlanta Clemson Black Alumni Council. She has been a member of the Clemson University Foundation Board since 2013.

Additionally, she has served on the advisory board and as a capital campaign volunteer for Clemson’s College of Engineering and Science. She established the Janine Anthony Bowen ’89 Industrial Engineering Endowment and the Jacquelwyn Willis Anthony PEER Endowment, named in her mother’s honor.

Bowen regularly volunteers with local community charities, including service on the boards of directors for Goodwill of North Georgia and the Atlanta Center for Self-Sufficiency. She was on the board for Samaritan House of Atlanta and volunteers for The Empty Stocking Fund Inc.

Bowen lives in Stone Mountain with her son, Jackson.

Douglas Duke Richardson ’64

The Clemson Alumni Association will present Douglas “Doug” Duke Richardson the 2016 Distinguished Service Award, the association’s highest honor.

“I am extremely proud to honor Douglas Richardson with the Distinguished Service Award,” said Clemson President James P. Clements. “He has done so much to support Clemson, and I am truly grateful for his contributions. His personal accomplishments serve as a wonderful model for our current and future students.”

Screen Shot 2016-05-18 at 10.59.33 AMRichardson graduated from Clemson in 1964 with a degree in industrial management and commission as a second lieutenant in the United States Army. His tours of duty included the Quartermaster Depot in Philadelphia and Vietnam.As a student at Clemson, Richardson was a member of Blue Key, Tiger Brotherhood and the Reserve Officer’s Training Corps honor guard, the Pershing Rifles. He was a member of the student Senate for three years.

He returned to South Carolina and forged a distinguished career in finance, culminating with his return to Clemson in 2001 to be the school’s director of finance and administration for Institutional Advancement Division. He held that position until he retired in 2007.

Serving as chief executive officer and treasurer of the Clemson University Foundation, Richardson modernized the accounting and processes of Institutional Advancement and was instrumental in the work to establish CU-ICAR.

He has been a member of the Clemson Legacy Society, the Academic Success Center advisory board and the Madren Center and John E. Walker Golf Course advisory board. He has been on the Clemson University Finance Corporation board of directors since 2008.

Richardson has served the Clemson community in volunteer positions in Clemson United Methodist Church and with the Boy Scouts of America. He received the Silver Beaver Award, which recognizes scouters of exceptional character who have provided distinguished service.

Richardson lives in Clemson with his wife, Wilmer. They have two grown sons, David and Ted, and five grandsons.

Bryant Graves Barnes ’76

The Clemson Alumni Association presented Bryant Graves Barnes of Rock Hill the 2016 Distinguished Service Award, the association’s highest honor.

“I am extremely proud to honor Bryant Barnes with the Distinguished Service Award,” said Clemson President James P. Clements. “He has Screen Shot 2016-05-18 at 11.19.46 AMdone so much to support Clemson, and I am truly grateful for his contributions. His personal accomplishments serve as a wonderful model for our current and future students.”Barnes is a 1976 graduate of Clemson with a long history of giving back to his alma mater. He was inducted into the Thomas Green Clemson Giving Society in 2013.

After graduating with a degree in electrical and computer engineering, Barnes built a successful career with Comporium, one of the largest telecommunications providers in the nation, rising through the ranks and becoming the chief executive officer. In 2002 he was chosen by then-South Carolina Gov. Jim Hodges to serve on the Technology Transition Team, a group focused on converting South Carolina to a knowledge-based economy.

As president and CEO of Comporium, Barnes was on the team that established the Optoelectronics Research Center of Economic Excellence in Clemson’s Holcombe Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, spearheading a $1 million contribution from Comporium to the initiative. He also was one of the Funding Partners who contributed $25,000 or more to the Barker Scholarship Endowment, established to provide need-based scholarships for undergraduate students.

Barnes and his family made a gift to repurpose Clemson’s 1902 Sheep Barn, the oldest agriculture-use building on campus, into a student engagement center. It will be named The Barnes Center in honor of his father, Frank Barnes, a 1942 Clemson graduate.

“In my service as Clemson president, I had a direct view of those who provided remarkable dedication and service to Clemson. Few can compare to Bryant Barnes,” wrote Clemson President Emeritus James F. Barker in a letter supporting Barnes’ nomination for the DSA. “His commitment to Clemson was not just manifested in words; rather, he showed his commitment by action.”

Barnes lives in Rock Hill with his wife, Lynn. They have three children — two, David and Emily, who are Clemson graduates, and Logan, who will graduate from Clemson this year.

E. Grantland Burns ’88

The Clemson Alumni Association presented Grant Burns of Greer with the 2016 Distinguished Service Award, the association’s highest honor.

“I am extremely proud to honor Grant Burns with the Distinguished Service Award,” said Clemson President James P. Clements. “He has done so much to support Clemson, and I am truly grateful for his contributions. His personal accomplishments serve as a wonderful model for our current and future students.”

Burns graduated from Clemson in 1988 with a degree in political sScreen Shot 2016-05-18 at 11.20.56 AMcience. As a student, he held many leadership positions, including student body president in 1987.

Burns has forged an exemplary career as a lawyer, litigating trials and arbitrations in 20 states. He was recognized for excellence by The Best Lawyers In America and Super Lawyers, and was president of Washington and Lee University Student Bar Association. He was named one of the “Best and Brightest — 35 and Under” by Greenville Magazine in 2000.

He is a member of the South Carolina Bar and served as a member of the House of Delegates from 2007-2012. He was president of the Greenville Young Lawyers Association and of the Greenville Bar Association. Currently he is the vice president and general council for AFL, a fiberoptics company with manufacturing facilities throughout the world.

His dedication to Clemson has never wavered. He was president of the Alumni Association from 2007-08 and was on the Clemson University Foundation board of directors, the Board of Visitors and the Greenville Clemson Luncheon Club.

He has consistently supported IPTAY and the athletics program by serving on the Tiger Golf Gathering Foundation board of directors, as an alumni delegate to the IPTAY board of directors, and as an IPTAY representative since 2003. He has been a continuous IPTAY donor since graduation and is a season ticket holder for both football and basketball.

Burns lives in Greer with his wife, Julie. They have two children: Camden, who attends Furman University, and Emory who is on track to graduate from Clemson in 2018.