Leslie Dunlap Callison ’81

The Clemson University Alumni Association will present Leslie Dunlap Callison of Lexington with the 2016 Distinguished Service Award, the association’s highest honor.

“I am extremely proud to honor Leslie Callison with the Distinguished Service Award,” said Clemson President James P. Clements. “She has done so much to support Clemson, and I am truly grateful for her contributions. Her personal accomplishments serve as a wonderful model for our current anScreen Shot 2016-05-18 at 10.55.38 AMd future students.”Callison graduated Clemson in 1981 with a bachelor’s in Administrative Management and went on to receive a Masters of Business Administration from the Unviersity of South Carolina in 1985. She has worked in the banking and pharmaceutical industries, and has contributed her time and talents to organizations in her hometown and at Clemson University.

Callison has dedicated much of her life to serving her beloved alma mater. She was president of the Alumni Association from 2008-2010, and served on the University Foundation Board of Directors, IPTAY Board of Directors, and the Women’s Alumni Council Board of Directors. Callison and her father, R. Thornwell Dunlap Jr, are the first father and daughter to serve as the Clemson Alumni Association President and to receive the Distinguished Service Award.

Callison spreads her generous spirit outside of Clemson to the great benefit of her community. She has served as a member of the founding Board of Directors of Columbia’s EdVenture Children’s Museum, treasurer of Junior League of Columbia’s Holiday Market, and Deacon at Saxa Gotha Presbyterian Church. She was also extensively involved in her children’s schools and activities, winning “Volunteer of the Year” in the Lexington School Sytem. Most recently, Leslie has worked as a community technology adviser for the nonprofit group Connect South Carolina.

“The Distinguished Service Award was created to honor the dedication and service of Clemson graduates to their alma mater, their community, and their profession; i.e., this special award was created to honor Leslie Callison,” Clemson president emeritus James F. Barker wrote in his letter supporting her nomination for the award. “Clemson University would not be having the success, progress and impact we are having without her insight and energy.”

Callison lives in Lexington with her husband, Scott. Together, they were awarded the Clemson Parents’ Council Chair Award, Parent Volunteers of the Year in 2010. They have two children who are also Clemson graduates –Reel ’12 and Caroline Lambert ’10.

Janine Anthony Bowen ’89 M’91

The Clemson Alumni Association will present Janine Anthony Bowen of Stone Mountain with the 2016 Distinguished Service Award, the association’s highest honor.

“I am extremely proud to honor Janine Bowen with the Distinguished Service Award,” said Clemson President James P. Clements. “She has done so much to support Clemson, and I am truly grateful for her contributions. Her personal accomplishments serve as a wonderful model for our current and future students.”

Screen Shot 2016-05-18 at 10.57.44 AMHer blend of skills as an engineer, technologist and attorney have led to a highly successful career in technology industry. She is a founding partner of JACK, an Atlanta-based law firm that specializes in negotiating strategic technology and intellectual property deals with Fortune 500 companies. In 2015, Bowen merged her practice with the national law firm LeClairRyan PC, where she is now a shareholder.Bowen graduated from Clemson in 1989 with a bachelor’s and in 1991 with a master’s degree, both in industrial engineering. She earned a juris doctor from Georgia State University College of Law in 1998.

Bowen has exhibited steadfast loyalty to Clemson by giving her time and skills to serve multiple alumni organizations. She served on the boards of directors of the Clemson Alumni Association and the Clemson Black Alumni Council. She also served on the boards of the Atlanta Clemson Club and the Atlanta Clemson Black Alumni Council. She has been a member of the Clemson University Foundation Board since 2013.

Additionally, she has served on the advisory board and as a capital campaign volunteer for Clemson’s College of Engineering and Science. She established the Janine Anthony Bowen ’89 Industrial Engineering Endowment and the Jacquelwyn Willis Anthony PEER Endowment, named in her mother’s honor.

Bowen regularly volunteers with local community charities, including service on the boards of directors for Goodwill of North Georgia and the Atlanta Center for Self-Sufficiency. She was on the board for Samaritan House of Atlanta and volunteers for The Empty Stocking Fund Inc.

Bowen lives in Stone Mountain with her son, Jackson.

Douglas Duke Richardson ’64

The Clemson Alumni Association will present Douglas “Doug” Duke Richardson the 2016 Distinguished Service Award, the association’s highest honor.

“I am extremely proud to honor Douglas Richardson with the Distinguished Service Award,” said Clemson President James P. Clements. “He has done so much to support Clemson, and I am truly grateful for his contributions. His personal accomplishments serve as a wonderful model for our current and future students.”

Screen Shot 2016-05-18 at 10.59.33 AMRichardson graduated from Clemson in 1964 with a degree in industrial management and commission as a second lieutenant in the United States Army. His tours of duty included the Quartermaster Depot in Philadelphia and Vietnam.As a student at Clemson, Richardson was a member of Blue Key, Tiger Brotherhood and the Reserve Officer’s Training Corps honor guard, the Pershing Rifles. He was a member of the student Senate for three years.

He returned to South Carolina and forged a distinguished career in finance, culminating with his return to Clemson in 2001 to be the school’s director of finance and administration for Institutional Advancement Division. He held that position until he retired in 2007.

Serving as chief executive officer and treasurer of the Clemson University Foundation, Richardson modernized the accounting and processes of Institutional Advancement and was instrumental in the work to establish CU-ICAR.

He has been a member of the Clemson Legacy Society, the Academic Success Center advisory board and the Madren Center and John E. Walker Golf Course advisory board. He has been on the Clemson University Finance Corporation board of directors since 2008.

Richardson has served the Clemson community in volunteer positions in Clemson United Methodist Church and with the Boy Scouts of America. He received the Silver Beaver Award, which recognizes scouters of exceptional character who have provided distinguished service.

Richardson lives in Clemson with his wife, Wilmer. They have two grown sons, David and Ted, and five grandsons.

Bryant Graves Barnes ’76

The Clemson Alumni Association presented Bryant Graves Barnes of Rock Hill the 2016 Distinguished Service Award, the association’s highest honor.

“I am extremely proud to honor Bryant Barnes with the Distinguished Service Award,” said Clemson President James P. Clements. “He has Screen Shot 2016-05-18 at 11.19.46 AMdone so much to support Clemson, and I am truly grateful for his contributions. His personal accomplishments serve as a wonderful model for our current and future students.”Barnes is a 1976 graduate of Clemson with a long history of giving back to his alma mater. He was inducted into the Thomas Green Clemson Giving Society in 2013.

After graduating with a degree in electrical and computer engineering, Barnes built a successful career with Comporium, one of the largest telecommunications providers in the nation, rising through the ranks and becoming the chief executive officer. In 2002 he was chosen by then-South Carolina Gov. Jim Hodges to serve on the Technology Transition Team, a group focused on converting South Carolina to a knowledge-based economy.

As president and CEO of Comporium, Barnes was on the team that established the Optoelectronics Research Center of Economic Excellence in Clemson’s Holcombe Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, spearheading a $1 million contribution from Comporium to the initiative. He also was one of the Funding Partners who contributed $25,000 or more to the Barker Scholarship Endowment, established to provide need-based scholarships for undergraduate students.

Barnes and his family made a gift to repurpose Clemson’s 1902 Sheep Barn, the oldest agriculture-use building on campus, into a student engagement center. It will be named The Barnes Center in honor of his father, Frank Barnes, a 1942 Clemson graduate.

“In my service as Clemson president, I had a direct view of those who provided remarkable dedication and service to Clemson. Few can compare to Bryant Barnes,” wrote Clemson President Emeritus James F. Barker in a letter supporting Barnes’ nomination for the DSA. “His commitment to Clemson was not just manifested in words; rather, he showed his commitment by action.”

Barnes lives in Rock Hill with his wife, Lynn. They have three children — two, David and Emily, who are Clemson graduates, and Logan, who will graduate from Clemson this year.

E. Grantland Burns ’88

The Clemson Alumni Association presented Grant Burns of Greer with the 2016 Distinguished Service Award, the association’s highest honor.

“I am extremely proud to honor Grant Burns with the Distinguished Service Award,” said Clemson President James P. Clements. “He has done so much to support Clemson, and I am truly grateful for his contributions. His personal accomplishments serve as a wonderful model for our current and future students.”

Burns graduated from Clemson in 1988 with a degree in political sScreen Shot 2016-05-18 at 11.20.56 AMcience. As a student, he held many leadership positions, including student body president in 1987.

Burns has forged an exemplary career as a lawyer, litigating trials and arbitrations in 20 states. He was recognized for excellence by The Best Lawyers In America and Super Lawyers, and was president of Washington and Lee University Student Bar Association. He was named one of the “Best and Brightest — 35 and Under” by Greenville Magazine in 2000.

He is a member of the South Carolina Bar and served as a member of the House of Delegates from 2007-2012. He was president of the Greenville Young Lawyers Association and of the Greenville Bar Association. Currently he is the vice president and general council for AFL, a fiberoptics company with manufacturing facilities throughout the world.

His dedication to Clemson has never wavered. He was president of the Alumni Association from 2007-08 and was on the Clemson University Foundation board of directors, the Board of Visitors and the Greenville Clemson Luncheon Club.

He has consistently supported IPTAY and the athletics program by serving on the Tiger Golf Gathering Foundation board of directors, as an alumni delegate to the IPTAY board of directors, and as an IPTAY representative since 2003. He has been a continuous IPTAY donor since graduation and is a season ticket holder for both football and basketball.

Burns lives in Greer with his wife, Julie. They have two children: Camden, who attends Furman University, and Emory who is on track to graduate from Clemson in 2018.

 

Robert J. “Bobby” Conrad Jr. ’80

The Clemson Alumni Association has recognized Judge Robert J. “BobbDSAVideoConrady” Conrad Jr. of Charlotte as one of five recipients of the 2015 Distinguished Service Award, the association’s highest honor.

Conrad is a 1980 graduate of Clemson, where he earned a Bachelor of Arts in history with a German minor. He was awarded the 1980 Norris Medal, the highest honor awarded at graduation. He was an Academic All-American and also a standout in athletics; starting as point guard on the basketball team that finished in the Elite Eight of the 1980 NCAA Tournament.

Conrad earned his law degree from the University of Virginia in 1983 and proceeded to carve out a legendary legal career that took him from the Upstate to the White House. He was selected by Attorney General Janet Reno to be the chief of her Campaign Financing Task Force in 2000. That same year he became the first lawyer to question in the same week a seated U.S. President and Vice President (Clinton and Gore) under oath. In 2001 his office successfully prosecuted the first trial of giving material support to a terrorist organization (Hezbollah) in the U.S. President George W. Bush nominated him as U.S. Attorney for Western North Carolina in 2001. As U.S. Attorney, he served on Attorney General John Ashcroft’s Advisory Committee. In 2005, he was confirmed by the Senate to a position as U.S. District Court Judge for the Western District of North Carolina.

Conrad has proven to be an outstanding ambassador for Clemson. He currently serves on Clemson’s Letterwinners Board of Directors, and was a member of President Barker’s Advisory Committee. He regularly mentors law students who are Clemson graduates, and has attended Clemson Club meetings in Charlotte, Rock Hill and Washington D.C. He was selected to Clemson’s Athletic Hall of Fame in 1993 and was chosen as one of Clemson’s All Time Top Twenty-Five players in 2013.

“I have come to this clear conclusion: Judge Robert Conrad has earned the Distinguished Service Award,” said Clemson president emeritus James F. Barker in his letter of nomination. “He has served his country with distinction. He has served his community with distinction. He has served his profession with distinction. And he has served our alma mater with distinction.”

Conrad and his wife, Ann, live in Charlotte. They have five children, two of whom, Bobby (2004) and Carrie (2010) are Clemson graduates.

Bobby Conrad

Gregg F. Morton ’78

The Clemson Alumni Association has recognized Gregg F. Morton of Clemson as one of five DSAVideoMortonrecipients of the 2015 Distinguished Service Award, the association’s highest honor.

Morton graduated from Clemson in 1978 with a Bachelor of Science in administrative management and started his career with Southern Bell that same year, having been recruited while he was still a student. He held assignments of increasing responsibility and in 2007 was named president of AT&T South Carolina and AT&T Tennessee. He was instrumental in leading adoption of policy changes that transformed the telecommunications industry from a monopoly to a highly competitive market.

Morton has a long history of contributing to Clemson through his personal giving and outside fundraising. He was directly responsible for securing more than $1 million in gifts and contributions to Clemson, including the donation for the AT&T auditorium at the CU-ICAR campus in Greenville.

Morton also serves on numerous advisory boards and commissions within the university, including the Board of Visitors.

Morton has served on the boards of numerous organizations outside of Clemson as well, including the United Way, the Boy Scouts of America, and the Nashville Symphony. Through all his endeavors, he never misses an opportunity to share the rich traditions of Clemson with others.

Morton is the patriarch of a true Clemson family: His wife, Cathy, graduated in 1979 and their children, Christopher and Katherine, graduated in 2006 and 2007, respectively.

Gerald M. Glenn ’64

The Clemson Alumni Association has recognized Gerald M. Glenn of The Woodlands, Texas as DSAVideoGlennone of five recipients of the 2015 Distinguished Service Award, the association’s highest honor.

Glenn graduated from Clemson in 1964 with a Bachelor of Science degree in civil engineering. He went on to become the , chairman, president and CEO of Chicago Bridge and Iron, one of the world’s largest construction companies.

“He was a true legend in the construction industry,” said Clemson president emeritus James F. Barker in a letter nominating Glenn for the award. “He led this Fortune 500 Company with distinction for many years and moved the company to Houston during that time. This decision proved to be brilliant.”

Glenn’s support of his alma mater has benefitted thousands of past, present and future students. In 2011 he and his wife, Candi, donated $5 million to name the Glenn Department of Civil Engineering. He is a major contributor to IPTAY, serves as a member of the Clemson University Foundation Board of Directors, and is a founding partner of the Barker Scholars Endowment; to name a few of his additional commitments to the school.

Glenn and his wife, Candi, share a commitment to community that reaches well beyond Clemson, contributing not just their financial resources, but their time and talent to multiple causes. They have been heavily involved in educational and charitable organizations, with Gerald and Candi always taking leadership roles in the institutions they support.

Glenn’s nomination letters are full off testimonies that he creates and seizes the opportunity to promote Clemson’s academics and athletics to everyone he encounters. He has recruited numerous students in his adopted state of Texas to enroll at Clemson – including both of his sons, Mike and Charlie, and several of their classmates.

“Few Clemson alumni are more dedicated to their alma mater than Gerald Glenn,” said Barker. “He will not rest until the entire state of Texas can sing the Clemson alma mater.”

Charles C. Mickel ’79

Charles C. Mickel of Greenville has been recognized as one of five recipients of the 2015 DSAVideoMickelDistinguished Service Award, the association’s highest honor.

Mickel received a Bachelors of Science in industrial management from Clemson in 1979 and went on to build a remarkable career in real estate investment.

Mickel’s success has enabled him to give back to his community and his alma mater in extraordinary ways.

He is a major donor to Clemson, and has supported numerous initiatives from capital campaigns to scholarships. He has served on the Clemson University Foundation Board, the Real Estate Board, and the President’s Advisory Board.

Perhaps most notably, he is credited with assisting with the implementation of the Clemson University International Center for Automotive Research (CU ICAR) facility in Greenville.

“We needed leadership to make it a reality,” said Clemson president emeritus James Barker. “We turned to Charlie Mickel and he responded with remarkable commitment, insight and passion for the idea. His quiet but tenacious leadership brought CU-ICAR into being. Simply stated, there would be no CU ICAR without him.”

Mickel’s commitment to service reaches far beyond the Clemson campus. He is the vice-chairman and treasurer of the Daniel-Mickel Foundation, a foundation dedicated to enhancing the quality of life for all people in the Greenville community. He is also passionate about the arts, and gives generously of his time and talent by serving as president of the Museum Association board and as incoming president to Artisphere, to name just two examples.

Mickel and his wife, Rachelle, live in Greenville and have two grown children.

Norman F. Pulliam, Sr. ’64

Norman F. Pulliam Sr. of Spartanburg has been presented with the 2015 Distinguished ServiceDSAVideoPulliam Award, the association’s highest honor.

Pulliam is a 1964 graduate of Clemson, who was president of the student senate, president of the Blue Key Honor Society and winner of the Algernon Sydney Sullivan Award, which honors service to campus and community. He received his MBA from Harvard University in 1967.

After graduating, Pulliam became a successful businessman, developing over half a billion dollars worth of properties throughout the southeast – primarily apartments and senior housing – as founder and president of Pulliam Investment Company Inc. for over 35 years. He has been very involved in his community, serving as either chairman or president for many organizations in Spartanburg, including the South Carolina School for the Deaf and the Blind, the Spartanburg Development Council, and the Spartanburg Boy’s Home. He is the former chairman and current trustee of the Spartanburg Regional Hospital Foundation, and currently serves on the S.C. Department of Natural Resources Board of Directors.

Pulliam continued his dedication to Clemson by providing the initial funding for the Clemson Masters of Real Estate Development program. He is a past member of the Clemson Board of Visitors, the Clemson Alumni Association Board of Directors and is a longtime major IPTAY supporter.

In 1985, he was awarded the South Carolina Order of the Palmetto, the state’s highest civilian award for extraordinary lifetime service and achievements of national and statewide significance.

In her letter supporting Pulliam’s nomination for the DSA, South Carolina Governor Nikki Haley said, “As a Clemson alumnus and citizen of the Palmetto State, Mr. Pulliam exemplifies servant leadership and civic engagement in the highest form.”

Pulliam lives in Spartanburg with his wife, Jo. They have three grown children – Tracey Rogers of Pawleys Island, Norman Pulliam Jr. of Spartanburg, and Thomas Pulliam of Greenville – and three grandchildren.